The Robins are Here

The Robins are here EARLY! The first time was in March. The groundhog prediction is right on! Spring is on its way “north”.

This is the second time catching the Robins gathering in this tree for a stop on their migration.

If I wasn’t taking a break from pulling down some vines, I wouldn’t have noticed them up high in the River Birch.

Robins Pit Stop

Can YOU dig it?

So you’d like to start a garden.

Does the thought of digging a new garden make you just opt for a large potting container instead?

This is no one’s favorite garden chore, but there’s no way around it. Your chosen site will probably have grass on it or at least weeds. These must be cleared somehow before you can plant anything.

Tilling without removing the grass or weeds is best done in the fall so that the grass will have a chance to begin decomposing during the winter. Even so, you will probably see new grass and weeds emerging in the spring. It’s better to either remove the existing vegetation completely or to smother it.

Lay at least 8 sheet layers of newspaper

NO DIGGING for the “patient” Gardener

A sharp flat-edged spade can be used to slice out the sod. If you have poor soil and need to amend it with organic matter or other nutrients, removing the sod may be your best bet, so that you can till in the amendments.

Removing sod can be heavy work, and you wind up losing good topsoil along with the sod. If your soil is in relatively good shape, it is possible to leave the grass in place and build on top of it. Place a thick layer (8-10 sheets) of newspaper over the garden bed and wet it thoroughly. Then cover the newspaper with 4-6 inches of good soil. The newspaper will eventually decompose, and the turf and weeds will be smothered. There may be some defiant weeds that poke through, but not so many you can hand weed them.

Starting with good soil means you won’t have to add a lot of artificial fertilizer to your garden. If you’ve fed the soil with amendments, the soil will feed your plants

Do you have creative garden ideas? Subscribe to our blog to learn and share!

“Regrowing” Store Bought Veggies

Fruit? Try fruit too!

Figs

Imagine having a bag of Figs in your refrigerator for about a year. No one is going to eat them! I decided to take that practically full bag and plant the figs in “my growing pot”. (That’s the pot for all my experiments!)

I totally forgot what I planted since I frequently stick flower stems, seeds, etc, into that growing pot, anything really, just for fun.

Much to my surprise some nice large green leaves popped up. I put a photo onto Facebook to try to get help identifying the leaf. (I forgot what I planted – it was a year ago) Everyone guessed wrong. It turned out to be Fig Trees!!!

The fig is similar to a maple leaf in the background

I have two in the ground but they sure liked being in that pot best!

Pineapple

This pineapple , you guessed it, is of course the green top of one I twisted off – bought at the store!

Black Eyed Peas are fun to grow

Black Eyed Peas

My friend gave me a baggie full of beans and said they’d put nitrogen back into the soil. Yes bought at the store!

Celery

Now that growing pot got taken over by Celery. I just pulled 7 out and placed in garden.

Sorry to say they are not store bought. They actually grew from seeds, I tossed in a year before!

Watch how to grow more store bought vegetables from my garden friend.

Regrow Store Bought Veggies

Veggies 🌶 veggies 🍅 veggies 🌽

What have you had luck growing? Comments encouraged!!

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