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One of the Oldest Trees in the World

In honor of The Senator, we named our massive Stag-horn Fern for the Old Cypress. Read on ….

Although humanity is destroying the planet quicker than Mother Nature can recover, fortunately, there are still natural wonders in this world that have survived for thousands of years.

All of the trees on this list are/were at least 3,500 years old — unfortunately, a few of these ancient giants were destroyed by human hands.

The rest of the surviving trees on this list are protected to prevent their destruction and one of the oldest individual trees even has a secret location not disclosed to the public. With continued conservation efforts, hopefully these trees will live for thousands of years more.

The Senator

Age: estimated to be 3,500 years
Species: Pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens)
Location: Longwood, Florida
Still Alive: No

The Senator

photo source: Wikimedia Commons

The Senator was one of the oldest and biggest bald cypress trees in the world with an estimated age of 3,500 years.

Prior to its demise, The Senator was 36 m tall (118 ft) with a circumference of 10.7 m (35 ft) — the tree was originally 50 m (165 ft) tall, but the top was damaged by a hurricane in 1925.

Unfortunately, the Senator was destroyed by a fire in 2012, which was started by Sarah Barnes and a friend who were smoking inside the tree; she left the fire burning which destroyed the tree from the inside out.

In 2014, a 50-foot-tall clone of The Senator (one of 10 trees cloned from The Senator in the 1990s) was planted in the park and named “The Phoenix.”

Did You Know?
In 2013, a group of artists were given permission by Seminole County to make vases, pens, flutes and sculptures from the charred remains of The Senator to pay respect to the fallen tree.

Have you ever visited Big Tree Park? The remains of the Senator are still visible but decaying. Sadly the park was named for the big tree that no longer exists.

Boat-tailed Grackle(Quiscalus major)

Taken in Merrit Island Florida – Anna Sarich
Range Map for Boat-tailed Grackle
Texas and Florida

Migration

Year-round resident. Most individuals spend their lives within about 10 miles of their birthplace.

The longest recorded movement comes from a second-year male that was banded in Charleston, South Carolina, and recovered in Daytona Beach, Florida, about 320 miles away by land.

Seed Terminology

Common Seed Catalog Definitions

Open-pollinated. Open-pollinated seeds are those that have been collected from plants that have undergone pollination from natural sources such as insects, birds, bats, wind, and fire. The offspring of open-pollinated plants will remain true to type – they will exhibit the same traits as their parents. (An exception to this occurs when two different varieties within the same species share pollen. This happens frequently when growing squash plants). When collecting and saving seed, do so from open-pollinated varieties.

Hybrid. Hybridized seed is produced when human plant breeders control the pollination of two different species or varieties and deliberately cross them together. The goal of hybridizing seed is to create plants that have traits that are desirable to growers. For example, they may be resistant to bolting or have a double flower form.

F₁. No, it’s not a tornado category! F₁ is the designation for the first generation of a hybridized seed. These seeds will possess the traits the varieties were specifically bred for. F₁ seed cannot be saved, as there are no guarantees that successive generations will be true to the parent (that is, exhibit the desired traits of the hybrid).

Heirloom. Heirloom seeds are those that are passed down from generation to generation, often within a certain geographical location. Some seed suppliers designate varieties that have a documented history of 50 years or more as heirlooms. Heirloom seeds are always open pollinated.

Treated or dressed seed. Treated seeds have been dressed with a coating that may contain fungicides, antimicrobial chemicals, or insecticides. The goal of applying the chemical at the same time the seed is planted is to minimize the risk of problems from insects or disease.

Days to maturity or days to harvest. This is the number of days it takes for a seed directly sown into the ground to germinate and grow to maturity. (In the case of transplants, it is the number of days from the time the plant is placed in the ground to the time it produces flowers or fruit). Unfortunately, this number isn’t set in stone – it may be altered by growing conditions and weather. It does act as a good guideline, however, and you can look at your region’s frost-free dates and use the days to maturity number to see if you have enough time to grow your crop and bring it to harvest.

Days to germinate. This is the number of days, under optimal growing conditions, that a seed will take to sprout.

Bare root. This is a common way for nurseries to ship trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennials. Plants are dug up, the soil is washed from their roots, and they are wrapped in a damp packing material for mailing. Bare root plants are usually cheaper to buy than those in containers.

Certified organic. Organic crops (and seeds collected from them) are grown without the use of synthetic pesticides or other chemicals. To be certified organic, a farmer or seed supplier must meet a series of standards issued by the government or other certifying body. These requirements may differ from country to country.

Determinate or indeterminate. Tomatoes are the first plants that usually come to mind when you think of determinate or indeterminate varieties. Determinate tomatoes have a compact, bush-like growth habit, reaching a maximum height of about 4 feet. They do not require staking. Indeterminate tomatoes are the vining types that grow continuously and produce fruit through the whole season until frost. They will require staking, as heights of 6 to 12 feet are common.

Grafted. Plants that are joined by combining a scion (the top part of one plant) to a rootstock (the base part of another plant which contains the root system) are considered grafted. They will look like they are a single plant, even though it is possible to graft several scions onto one rootstock. The different species of plants must be compatible and the graft must be performed successfully in order for the grafted plant to thrive.

Hardiness zone. This refers to a map of the lowest temperatures recorded in a given region. The temperature ranges are then matched to a number, which is used to designate plants that will withstand the minimum temperatures in that particular location.

Pelleted seed. Tiny seeds are sometimes pelleted (coated) with powdered clay or other materials to make them easier to handle and sow. (This is particularly useful in large-scale agriculture, where mechanized seeders are used but it is also handy in small garden settings). Seed treatments such as fungicides are sometimes added to pelleted seed.

Bolting. Many cool-weather crops such as cilantro, spinach, and lettuce will flower and go to seed rapidly in hot weather. This process is called bolting. Unfortunately, bolting usually causes produce to become bitter and unsuitable for harvest. Breeders have created plants that are less likely to bolt and if this is a common issue in your garden, look for cultivars that claim to be “resistant to bolting.”

Now that you’re in the know, have fun ordering plants and seeds for spring!

Start planning your garden!

Credit The Farmers Almanac

Seed Terminology

Common Seed Catalog Definitions

Open-pollinated. Open-pollinated seeds are those that have been collected from plants that have undergone pollination from natural sources such as insects, birds, bats, wind, and fire. The offspring of open-pollinated plants will remain true to type – they will exhibit the same traits as their parents. (An exception to this occurs when two different varieties within the same species share pollen. This happens frequently when growing squash plants). When collecting and saving seed, do so from open-pollinated varieties.

Hybrid. Hybridized seed is produced when human plant breeders control the pollination of two different species or varieties and deliberately cross them together. The goal of hybridizing seed is to create plants that have traits that are desirable to growers. For example, they may be resistant to bolting or have a double flower form.

F₁. No, it’s not a tornado category! F₁ is the designation for the first generation of a hybridized seed. These seeds will possess the traits the varieties were specifically bred for. F₁ seed cannot be saved, as there are no guarantees that successive generations will be true to the parent (that is, exhibit the desired traits of the hybrid).

Heirloom. Heirloom seeds are those that are passed down from generation to generation, often within a certain geographical location. Some seed suppliers designate varieties that have a documented history of 50 years or more as heirlooms. Heirloom seeds are always open pollinated.

Treated or dressed seed. Treated seeds have been dressed with a coating that may contain fungicides, antimicrobial chemicals, or insecticides. The goal of applying the chemical at the same time the seed is planted is to minimize the risk of problems from insects or disease.

Days to maturity or days to harvest. This is the number of days it takes for a seed directly sown into the ground to germinate and grow to maturity. (In the case of transplants, it is the number of days from the time the plant is placed in the ground to the time it produces flowers or fruit). Unfortunately, this number isn’t set in stone – it may be altered by growing conditions and weather. It does act as a good guideline, however, and you can look at your region’s frost-free dates and use the days to maturity number to see if you have enough time to grow your crop and bring it to harvest.

Days to germinate. This is the number of days, under optimal growing conditions, that a seed will take to sprout.

Bare root. This is a common way for nurseries to ship trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennials. Plants are dug up, the soil is washed from their roots, and they are wrapped in a damp packing material for mailing. Bare root plants are usually cheaper to buy than those in containers.

Certified organic. Organic crops (and seeds collected from them) are grown without the use of synthetic pesticides or other chemicals. To be certified organic, a farmer or seed supplier must meet a series of standards issued by the government or other certifying body. These requirements may differ from country to country.

Determinate or indeterminate. Tomatoes are the first plants that usually come to mind when you think of determinate or indeterminate varieties. Determinate tomatoes have a compact, bush-like growth habit, reaching a maximum height of about 4 feet. They do not require staking. Indeterminate tomatoes are the vining types that grow continuously and produce fruit through the whole season until frost. They will require staking, as heights of 6 to 12 feet are common.

Grafted. Plants that are joined by combining a scion (the top part of one plant) to a rootstock (the base part of another plant which contains the root system) are considered grafted. They will look like they are a single plant, even though it is possible to graft several scions onto one rootstock. The different species of plants must be compatible and the graft must be performed successfully in order for the grafted plant to thrive.

Hardiness zone. This refers to a map of the lowest temperatures recorded in a given region. The temperature ranges are then matched to a number, which is used to designate plants that will withstand the minimum temperatures in that particular location.

Pelleted seed. Tiny seeds are sometimes pelleted (coated) with powdered clay or other materials to make them easier to handle and sow. (This is particularly useful in large-scale agriculture, where mechanized seeders are used but it is also handy in small garden settings). Seed treatments such as fungicides are sometimes added to pelleted seed.

Bolting. Many cool-weather crops such as cilantro, spinach, and lettuce will flower and go to seed rapidly in hot weather. This process is called bolting. Unfortunately, bolting usually causes produce to become bitter and unsuitable for harvest. Breeders have created plants that are less likely to bolt and if this is a common issue in your garden, look for cultivars that claim to be “resistant to bolting.”

Now that you’re in the know, have fun ordering plants and seeds for spring!

Start planning your garden!

Credit The Farmers Almanac

Bee Balm


Spotted Bee Balm – Monarda Punctata (100% Heirloom/Non-Hybrid/Non-GMO)

If you have an area of yard you would like to shield for a bit more privacy, consider planting a border of bee balm.

  • The spotted bee balm plant produces a beautiful plant with purple spotted flowers known to attract bees and other beneficial garden pollinators.
  • Common names include bee balm, horsemint, oswego tea, and wild bergamot.
  • Smell is similar to thyme.
  • Has been used in teas and for other medicinal purposes.
  • This plant is drought tolerant. Grows well in dry conditions, requiring little water to grow.
  • Can grow up to 40″ tall.
  • Perennial.

Many varieties grow to be 3-4 feet tall, making them an ideal mid-height privacy screen.

When you consider that bee balm’s scent naturally repels most insects, it becomes a prime candidate to plant around your porch or patio. 🐝

The leaves and flowers are edible and make a delicious (and healthy) tea and popular folk remedies. Even if you don’t care to eat them, the impressive flowers, with their long, sturdy stems, are an obvious choice in cut-flower arrangements. Their sweet, citrusy scent is a bonus.

Growing Bee Balm

Bee balm grows easily in USDA hardiness zones 4-9. The plant prefers rich, moist soil but needs good airflow among its leaves. It will flourish in full sun and does well in partial shade. If you have a shaded area of your lawn for a portion of the day, bee balm will be quite happy there.

DeltonaGardenClub.com for more great articles.

Blanket Flowers Increase Arthropod Predators and Pollinators in Citrus Groves – Citrus Industry Magazine

While many arthropod predator and pollinator activities benefit crop quality and yields, traditional farming environments may not be ideal…
— Read on citrusindustry.net/2023/01/09/blanket-flowers-increase-arthropod-predators-and-pollinators-in-citrus-groves/

Sprouts or Micro-greens, What’s the Difference?

SPROUTS: 

Each and every living seed will grow into a plant. It’s when that seed begins to grow (germinate) that we call the beginning growth stage of the plant a “sprout”. Oftentimes, people germinate will grow sprouts in water. To ensure that they do not get moldy, those seeds are rinsed several times a day. Sprouts grow very quickly, and can be harvested in about four to six days!

This is the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten either raw or cooked. They are a convenient way to have fresh vegetables for salads, or otherwise, in any season and can be germinated at home or produced industrially.

Sprouts are said to be rich in digestible energy, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, proteins, and phytochemicals!

All Sprouts & Micro-Greens

MICRO-GREENS:

Studies say that Micro-greens are “the new nutritional powerhouse”. Baby spinach and baby lettuces are available in most grocery stores, but a new study says that even younger greens might give us more nutritional benefits. Micro-greens are tiny leaves that are less than 14 days old. They take a little longer to grow, around one to three weeks, depending on the variety. The seed, unlike sprouts, cannot be eaten because it is in the soil. These greens can provide you with plenty of nutrients, possibly even more than the full-sized varieties.

These are nutrient-dense greens. They make perfect salads and are best suiting for appetizers or adding to green drinks and smoothies. They’re often used in fancy restaurants and they can be pricey in health food stores. But there’s no need to pay a small fortune for them. For the price of a few tubs of regular salad greens, you can grow enough Micro-greens to enjoy a whole seasons worth of salads, packed with top-notch vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.

All Sprouts & Micro-Greens

FREE Organic Gardening E-Book

What’s inside

We want everyone to be successful at growing their own organic garden. That’s why we’ve created this eBook and that’s why we are giving it away – for free. This eBook includes everything you ever wanted to know about growing your own food – and more!

Format:  Digital PDF

# of Pages: 175 pages
File Size: 45MB

♥ Share this with your friends and you could win free seeds!

Organic Gardening pdf download

January 2023 Planning

  • 12th – 14th A favorable time for sowing grains, hay, and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable days for planting root crops.
  • 15th – 16th Start seedbeds. Good days for transplanting. Plant carrots, turnips, onions, beets, Irish potatoes, other root crops in the South. Also good for leafy vegetables.
  • 17th – 18th Do no planting. Good harvest days.
  • 19th – 20th Good planting days for root crops where climate permits.
  • 21st – 22nd A good time to kill plant pests or do plowing. Poor for planting.
  • 23rd – 24th Extra good for peppers, tomatoes, peas and other vine crops. Fine for planting any aboveground crop where the climate permits.
  • 25th – 26th Barren days, do no planting.
  • 27th – 29th Fine for planting beans, peppers, cucumbers, melons, and other aboveground crops where climate is suitable.
  • 30th – 31st Poor days for planting, seeds tend to rot in ground.

GARDENING TO KEEP NEW YEARS RESOLTIONS

RESOLUTION #1: YOU WANT TO GET IN SHAPE

Whether this means losing weight or exercising more, gardening can help! There’s plenty to do in the garden that will give you a really good workout.

A tool on the ground? Drop into a squat to pick that up!

Carrying a watermelon? That’s totally a bicep workout!

And that doesn’t even include how all the healthy produce you’re growing will help you with your diet.

RESOLUTION #2: YOU WANT TO EAT HEALTHIER

A part of eating healthier is eating more fruits and veggies. So, think about your favorite fruits or veggies, and go grow those.

There’s nothing healthier than eating homegrown food. And junk food doesn’t grow on trees. That’s all I’m sayin’.

RESOLUTION #3: YOU WANT TO SAVE MONEY

Gardening can save money on fresh organic produce for your family. You could save even more if you grow some storage vegetables, like winter squash, or can some food for use during the winter.

Plus, if you’re spending days out in the garden, you’re not out spending money on activities and shopping for things you don’t really need.

RESOLUTION #4: YOU WANT TO BE MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS

Gardening is as green as it gets!

If you’re growing your own organic produce, there’s no plastic packaging, no plastic bags, and no carbon footprint. Make it a double whammy by decreasing waste and composting at home, too!

RESOLUTION #5: YOU WANT TO LEARN NEW THINGS/A NEW HOBBY

Gardening is a fantastic, healthy hobby, and it’s fun for those who like to experiment.

I have only been growing food for about 6 years, and there’s never been a shortage of new plants to try. It seems like the more I learn, the more I want to know.

With gardening, I’m always trying and learning new things.

RESOLUTION #6: YOU WANT TO BE MORE PRODUCTIVE

We all want to get more done in the day. And you might wonder how adding garden tasks to your to-do list could possibly help you get more done.

But I argue that gardening will improve your mood, help you clear your mind, and calm your nerves so you can get more done. Plus, gardening is a very productive hobby all on its own.

RESOLUTION #7: YOU WANT TO BREAK YOURSELF OF A BAD HABIT

Changing habits is really hard. But distraction is key.

Idle hands are the devil’s workshop as they say. Focusing your energy on something productive, like gardening, will help you steer clear of that nasty habit you want to break.

RESOLUTION #8: YOU WANT TO DECREASE YOUR STRESS

A garden needs to be tended, and completing garden chores is a perfect opportunity for some peace and quiet. Or maybe you prefer to play music and dance while you pull weeds in the garden.

Create the perfect song playlist for gardening.

I might do either. It just depends on my mood, but they’re both great stress relievers.

RESOLUTION #9: YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME WITH YOUR KIDS

Maybe in the midst of busy work, school, and sports schedules, you don’t get to spend time with your family.

The garden is a great place to gather and work together. Show the kids all the bugs on your tomatoes.

Taste test different types of fruits and veggies and talk about which ones you like and don’t like. Give them their own set of garden tools for playing in the dirt.

Imagine the adorable photo ops!

RESOLUTION #10: YOU WANT TO SPEND LESS TIME ONLINE OR ON TV

There’s plenty of work to be done in the garden. Hours and hours of work if you want.

If your goal is to get off the couch, the garden is a great place to go. Plus, once you start seeing your plants grow, you’ll want to be out there checking on them and reveling in the fruits of your labor.

RESOLUTION #11: YOU WANT TO BE MORE CHARITABLE

You can always find someone to give your extra produce to, and sometimes you’re helping them more than you know.

Do you know someone who can’t grow their own food?

Maybe your neighbor loves their garden, but they can’t get out to tend it. Ask them if you can help.

Do you live in a close-knit community? Maybe you could set up a give a veggie/take a veggie stand in your yard. How fun!

RESOLUTION #12: YOU WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR SPOUSE

Gardening is a great activity to do with your spouse. I have always loved working in the garden with my husband.

We have cleared walking trails in our woods together, built raised beds together, and tied up tomatoes together. We plant, prune, harvest, and pull weeds together.

Sometimes we talk, sometimes we don’t. Sometimes I dance, most of the time he won’t.

The point is, we are working on something together and that brings us closer. Plus, gardening is sexy, y’all.

WHAT IS YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION AND HOW CAN GARDENING HELP YOU KEEP IT?

So what do you think? Are you ready to take up gardening to help you keep your new year’s resolution?

Share your experience in the comments below.

DeltonaGardenClub.com

Wreaths Through Time

Tradition of Hanging Wreaths

The tradition of hanging wreaths made from evergreen boughs is thought to have begun in the 1500s in ancient Germany and Scandinavia, notably during Yule festivities. Timed to coincide with the winter solstice, Yule celebrated the return of the sun and the promise of spring.

However, wreaths crafted from natural materials have been used for millennia, sometimes worn on the head or around the neck, and sometimes hung on walls and doors.

Ancient pagan cultures believed that trees were homes to protective spirits and used wreaths made from tree branches in rituals relating to the changing seasons and fertility.

Pre-Christian Europeans added lit candles to evergreen wreaths as beacons of hope for the coming spring. During the Middle Ages, Christians adapted the tradition of candlelit wreaths in the form of Advent wreaths which they displayed in preparation for Christmas.

In Ancient Greece, wreaths were awarded in recognition of military achievements as well as to the victors of athletic, music, and poetry competitions. Winners of the Olympic Games, first held in 776 BCE, wore wreaths made from the leaves of olive or laurel trees.

Early Romans adopted the wearing of laurel wreaths from the Greeks as symbols of military victory. The type of foliage in a wreath eventually came to represent the status, rank, or occupation of the wearer. 

Some Native American tribes wore wreaths during ceremonial dances, including wreaths made of sage, an herb traditionally used in rituals to cleanse people and places of negative spiritual energies.

A part of the Ukrainian national costume, the flower wreath is traditionally worn by girls and unmarried women on festive occasions and on holy days. However, the region’s custom of wearing wreaths made from herbs, flowers, and brightly colored ribbons may date as far back as the 9th century.

Across Polynesia, wreaths called lei are worn by both men and women as decoration and are offered as gifts signifying affection or respect. In Hawai‘i, Pā‘ū riders are a fixture in most parades. Women dressed in flowing pā‘ū skirts and their male attendants all ride on horseback, representing different Hawaiian Islands or districts. Both the riders and horses wear lei made of symbolic plants.  

Throughout the world, wreaths have been used in ceremonies of remembrance. In addition to the display of flower wreaths at funerals, traditions include the floating of wreaths in water to honor those lost at sea, as well as the laying of wreaths at war memorials.

Wreath Construction

Anything that can be crafted into a circular form can be made into a wreath. Craft stores sell wreath forms made from wire, straw, and other materials in a variety of sizes. Pine boughs and other greens, as well as pinecones, berries, and other decorations can be wired or glued onto the form.

Do-it-yourself wreath forms include a wire hanger bent into a circle, a donut-shaped ring of cardboard, and woody vines woven into a circle.

Herbs, flowers, and other plants have historically been used to signify different sentiments. For example:

  • Rosemary: remembrance
  • Sage: wisdom, good health, long life
  • Thyme: bravery
  • Lavender: purity
  • Rue: virtue
  • Juniper: life and hope
  • Calendula: health, joy
  • Lavender: love, happiness, protection
  • Yarrow: courage
  • Sunflowers: spiritual growth, radiance, energy
  • Oak leaves: courage, strength

Tucking a few sprigs into wreaths add extra meaning, or simply use them to add fragrance, color, and texture.

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FlipGive Funding!!

Hi team,

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Yesterday I ordered from Walmart like I do all the time. Now I can get paid back a bit!
So can you!!!

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Or enter this code: H2L6GX

Any questions, just ask!
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Want to learn more? Check out this 2 minute video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vTO_Qg4n80

Anna Sarich

October in Florida

  • Farmers throughout Florida have already been plowing and planting their seeds in anticipation of the upcoming vegetable growing season. Very soon the vegetables we buy in the market will be marked “Florida Grown” rather than “Product of …”.
Shopping List!
  • October is the time for planting these great little fruits. Keep your plants’ soil moist by watering every two to three days and be certain to fertilize appropriately. Be on the lookout for caterpillars, slugs, thrips, mites and snails looking to snack on your plants.
  • Rose growing in Florida can be difficult; however there are a few easy steps to ensure you’re as successful as possible. Prepare your soil by adding dry cow manure and peat moss. Select roses locally to ensure best growing and blooming success.
  • Winter veggies are on! Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Chinese Cabbage, Carrots, Collards, Cucumbers, Escarole, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Mustard, Okra, Onion Sets, Parsnips, Peppers, Pumpkins, Rhubarb, Romaine, Rutabagas, Spinach, Squash, Strawberries, Sweet Corn, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips are all great vegetables to consider starting this month for a great winter’s harvest!
  •  Many of the fall grasses have formed their inflorescent this month. To extend your garden’s reach, these can be trimmed and dried for use in other displays this month for a great winter’s harvest!
  • Much of Florida’s citrus begins to ripen and can be enjoyed from tree to table!

Leaf of Life -Medicinal

Leaf of Life -Here Are 46 Amazing Health Benefits Of The Leaf Of Life Plant

Treats Kidney stones – In case of kidney stones, give 40-50 ml decoction of the whole plant twice a day. You can also give the decoction with 500 mg shilajit and 2 gm. of honey mixed in it. Give this twice a day, it helps treat bile stone easily.

Useful in Urinary disorders – Give 5 ml juice of its leaves to the patient suffering from thirst and any disorder related to the urinary system. It is a very good and effective remedy. In the case of urine related disorder in men, give 40-60 ml of its decoction with 2 gm. honey mixed in it. Give this twice a day.

Helpful in Boils – Slightly warm its leaves and crush them. Tie it as a poultice on the affected area. It helps treat boils, redness, and swelling too.

For Hypertension – Give 5-10 drops of the extract of its aerial parts. It is beneficial in controlling blood pressure.

Curbs Leukemia – Give 5-10 drops of the extract of its aerial part, twice a day. It is beneficial in blood cancer.

For Vaginal disorders – In case of vaginal flow in women, give 40-60 ml decoction with 2 gm. honey mixed in it. Give this twice a day.

Treats Headache – Crush its leaves and apply it on the forehead. It helps treat headaches.

Aids in Eye pain – Extract the juice of its leaves and apply all around the eyes. It helps treat pain in the white part of the eyes.

Treatment for Wounds – Slightly warm the leaves and then crush them and tie on the wound. It helps the wound heal faster and also eliminates the scar.

Helps treat bleeding diarrhea – Give 3-6 gm. juice of its leaves with cumin seeds and double amount of ghee mixed in it. Give this to the patient thrice a day. It controls the blood flow in diarrhea.

Manage leucorrhoea – For women who suffer from leucorrhoea ailment, use the decoction of the leaves twice daily. It helps delay the flow of blood within the blood vessels.

Treat piles at home – Drink the extract of the leaves twice daily to get an effective remedy for piles.

Good for the liver – Leaf of life promotes the health of the liver. It can help treat jaundice fast.

Treat ear pain – Get a fast remedy for your ear pain by applying the juice of the leaves.

Help treat boils – Crush a few leaves and form a poultice. Apply this on the boils. You can use this on redness and swelling of the skin.

Helps heart health – It improves the health of the heart.

Treat colds and coughs – For common cold and coughs, the juice of the leaves along with sugar candy will help. This can help people suffering from asthma also.

Anti-inflammatory property – By applying the paste of the leaves on the place of the swelling, you can reduce it significantly.

Relieves stomach ache – If you have a stomach ache, you can get relief by having the decoction of the leaves.

Diuretic action – You can treat urinary disorders with the juice of the leaf of life. This is good for quenching excessive thirst. Drink a potion of 40-60 ml every day in the morning and evening.

Teething problems – Babies who are cutting their first teeth will have relief from the pain.

Anthelmintic action – It helps remove worms in the intestine effectively. Have the decoction of the leaves twice a day with honey.

Antipyretic property – If you have a fever, the miracle leaf will help relieve your symptoms.

Corrects dysentery – Have the leaf extract with honey to get relief from dysentery.

Helps with weight management – You can lose weight by using its leaves.

Prevents grey hair – Regular use of the miracle leaf will help prevent the greying of hair. It promotes the health of the scalp too.

Good anti-oxidant property – Make tea with the dried leaves and have it twice or thrice a day. This will help you fight free radicals better.

Helpful for diabetics – Control your diabetes with the leaves. Have the decoction twice every day and see your blood sugar levels drop significantly.

Helps treat constipation – You can get relief from your constipation by having the tea made from the dried powder of the leaves.

Purifies blood – Miracle leaf has a purifying action on the blood. It removes the toxins and helps improve your health.

Juice for chest cold – Warm 3 leaves and juice them. This should yield 2-3 tablespoon of the leaf of life juice. Add a pinch of salt. Take one tablespoon three times a day for as long as needed.

Poultice for skin ulcer, sprains, and insect stings – Grind 7 fresh leaves into a poultice. Apply the poultice evenly to the affected area. Apply a fresh poultice twice a day, morning and night, as often as needed.

Pounded leaves are applied as poultices to the soles of the feet to stop hemorrhages.

Leaves are used as topical in dislocation, ecchymosis, callosities.

It is widely used as an herbal remedy for many different types of ailments, especially bronchial conditions.

An herbal tea made from this herb is useful to treat conditions such as shortness of breath, kidney failure, menstrual problems, asthma, coughs, bronchitis, as well as a chest cold.

Crushed medicinal leaves of this herb will bring relief from insect bites, bruises, boils, and also skin ulcers.

A poultice of the crushed leaves can also be applied to the outer body for sprains, pains, as well as earaches.

Placing the back of the leaves on open sores, cuts and wounds will promote healing, stops bleeding as well as prevents infection.

Stem as well as the leaves can be placed in water and taken daily to rid the body of mucous and waste matter.

Fresh leaves of the leaf of life can also be eaten raw as a medicinal remedy for asthma, bronchitis, and intestinal problems.

Leaf extract is taken on an empty stomach for treatment of urinary bladder stones and fever in children in Arunachal Pradesh.

Cough medicine is made from the roots in Sierra Leon

Heated leaves used for swellings and abscesses in Jamaica.

It is used for rheumatoid arthritis, bruises, burns, and ulcers in China.

In the KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, leaves used in combination with Opuntia stricta and Euphorbia hypericifolia to treat gonorrhea.

Other Facts

It also makes a very decorative addition to the garden.

The leaves can be picked and stored for days without withering.

It is grown in the garden for ornamental purposes.

Precautions – Patients under ‘Aspirin’ medication should take care to take the decoction or fresh juice of the leaf of life plant as it may interact or reduce the efficacy of Aspirin.

Leaf Of Life

Native to Madagascar, but is found throughout the world today because of its many healing properties and health benefits. It has various names such as Goethe plant, Love bush, Air plant, Cathedral bells. It is commonly called Leaf of Life in Guyana.

Courtesy of Deltona Garden Club

DeltonaGardenClub.com

How to Grow Turk’s Cap Flowers (Malvaviscus arboreus), Explained

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Fall/Winter Harvest Seed Bank

The Fall/Winter Harvest Seed Bank includes a collection of all the seeds you need to grow your favorite fall and winter crops.

Click picture to see all the seeds!
20 varieties of crops (individually packaged)

These seeds thrive in cold weather and are extremely hardy.

You will be able to grow your own brussels sprouts, carrots, kale, broccoli, turnips, swiss chards and so much more. With over 20 popular varieties included, this seed bank is your #1 seed bank of choice for seeds that thrive in cooler temps.

What’s Included?

  • Over 6,500 seeds in total (all seeds can be saved for multiple planting seasons)
  • BONUS! We’re including 25 seed starting soil pellets (so you can start your seeds indoors!)
  • Seeds are individually packaged and labeled in resealable bags and then secured in a Mylar bag (provides two layers of protection from moisture and light)

Fall Vegetables for 9b

Many of you expressed interest in setting up and growing a vegetable garden this summer.

Most of the vegetables do not like extreme heat. I wouldn’t recommend the mindset of traditional growing seasons if you have never grown in Florida! Planning ahead makes the difference.

It’s not too late to set seeds out or pre-sprout indoors. This list will also work for Jan-Feb planting preparation for spring.

Fall is perfect for all the cool weather loving starts. The daily rain works in our favor if you’d like to try growing a fall garden. Summer requires daily watering and fending off heat loving pests! Everyone deserves a break from the heat!!! So give it a try!

Remember the prices on the produce aisle? That should be motivation enough! The best part is you won’t have to worry about how or where your produce was grown.

If you aren’t really “into gardening” but like a little spice in your life, why not grow some herbs?

Herbs such as oregano, rosemary and basil are great in a planter. They also enjoy a little cool weather. The oregano plant that I have is at least 20 years old! Ah fresh herbs. Just the smell makes me hungry!

Get out there and then you can Mangia Bene! (Eat Well). Ciao (chow?) No….🤪

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